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All of Us Are One, Street Pulse

Is It Time to Tell Your Story

Written by Ronnie Barbett

For some time now, Street Pulse now has established itself as a major employment opportunity for those trying to increase their cash flow. It’s a deal that the homeless population can profit from in a business – like manner. More important than all that, every issue of Street Pulse provides a voice for the homeless. The power source behind this magazine should be disappointed in the lack of reading/writing material that comes their way. The stories behind the homeless issues are endless, complex, and unnecessarily stupid. Homeless people are human beings that may or may not have been on top. They feel down, made some bad decisions, ended up in a low income bracket, or lost when they should have won. My point now is this: everybody has, by word-of-mouth, voiced their winds and losses to the people next to them. So what’s going on is circulated in the streets and talked about in all the places we hang out. Hey People!! Let’s take it a step further. Street Pulse is standing by.

Street Pulse, the paper, can be full of informative stories about homelessness. We need to alert our people about getting transportation (bus passes), money (Quest Card), shelter (Porch Light, Salvation Army, etc), and food (Luke House). Information to help each other survive is important! We must help each other. Our stories are worth writing, and yes, worth reading out loud. Others can learn from our mistakes and benefits from our successes. Getting an apartment, finding a job, telling all the details as to how is a good start for those struggling. I am waiting and so are others at Street Pulse. I’ll write for you if you want me to.  Please contact Street Pulse – I’m Ronnie Barbett.

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About Operation Welcome Home

OWH is a group of homeless people in Madison, WI and their allies organizing around the root causes of homelessness- racism, poverty, and criminalization. We are fighting for housing, jobs, and an end to the criminalization of poverty.

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